Category Archives: Social Studies

Cultural Anthropology (HS) (Sam)

Note: This class is open to high school students only.

 

Cultural Anthropology (HS)

 

Learning is a lifelong pursuit, and most move to acquire an understanding of the differences and similarities, both biological and cultural, in human populations. In this class, we will be able to recognize the characteristics that define their culture and gain an appreciation for the culture of others. The content includes, but not be limited to, the following: human biological and cultural origins and adaptation to the physical environment, diversity of human behavior, an evolution of social and cultural institutions. Other patterns of language development along with family and kinship relationships and effects of change on such cultural institutions as the arts, education, religion, and law.

 

Some class activities to expect:

Note Taking

Vocabulary 

Short Answer quizzes

Short Writing Assignments

Mini Project

Cultural Analysis Reports

Blackish/Wonder Years (MS/HS) (Sam)

Blackish/Wonder Years – Film Class (MS/HS)

Everyone loves a good show! I want to showcase black history this year in a unique way, through the lens of film. The shows Black-ish and The Wonder Years provide a snapshot into the lives of African Americans and how they navigate life in the US. While the method of using comedy versus a more serious approach is on two different planes, each show is packed with so much information and scenes that cause us to pause and think deeply about what we experienced. We will watch the shows together and dive into deep conversations about what we see visually in each show. Also, there will be time to write our thoughts down and even take on mini-projects that share how we relate to these amazing shows.

Contemporary World Problems (HS) (Sam)

Note: This class is open to high school students only.

Contemporary World Problems

The study of Contemporary World Issues is a class designed to engage and prepare students to analyze governments, people, and cultures from around the world. We will begin with some basic knowledge and understanding of past history. It will then emphasize the structures and policies of the United States and how they compare to other systems in the international community. Then we will apply critical thinking and research skills to examine current events and contemporary issues, including human rights, globalization, America’s role in the international economy, environmental issues in different regions, religion(s), and how it is often used to facilitate and justify violence and behavior, “War on Terror” and more.

Some class activities to expect:

Note Taking

Vocabulary 

Short Answer quizzes

Writing Assignments

Research Paper

Sociology of the International District (hannah)

How does our school community connect to the International District community? What is the history of the ground we walk on? How can we be in just relationship with our neighbors? 

We go to school in the heart of a rich historical and cultural urban enclave. The International District is a multiethnic concentrated area that includes Chinatown, Japantown, Little Saigon, and Manilatown. Chinese immigrants first came to the PNW in the 1850s. Since then, the sociology of the International District has been shaped by legislature, migration, war, environment, business, gentrification, racism, culture, and resistance. 

Sociology is a science focusing on society, human behavior, relationships, and interactions. In this class, we will learn about the history of the ID in order to understand the sociology of the area over time and today. Class will include visits to local businesses, museums, and parks throughout the term. I hope to have members from the community come speak with us. 

Diverse Voices & Yummy Things (elizabeth ortega)

In this class, we’ll gather to consume and discuss media by and about diverse humans. We’ll hear from various voices on topics like identity, queerness, institutional racism and human rights, global issues and we’ll pull from assorted forms of media including podcasts and news sources. Each class one of you will provide either a yummy treat or a yummy beverage for everyone to share!

I’ll provide options each day, y’all will vote and bam! We listen and discuss.

Whiteness/straightness/cis-ness/male-ness etc. in media is the norm; this is an opportunity to approach important topics from a different viewpoint and perspective. 

No homework, just come ready to contribute to discussions each day and eat yummy things and THINK and PONDER and FEEL!

Philosophy III (hannah)

Note: This class is open to high school students only.

THERE’S MORE TO PHILOSOPHIZE ABOUT. If you want to join the class but didn’t take it in prior terms, talk to me.

Indigenous People’s History (Cont) (HS) (Sam)

Note: This class is open to high school students only.

Indigenous People’s History (Cont) (HS)

 

When we hear about the start of this country, it always begins with the landing on the East Coast (Plymouth Rock). We all know by now that much more was going on way before then. This class will read and analyze the book, An Indigenous Peoples’ History Of The United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. We will talk about the many people groups and nations that were a part of this land before the invasion of British settlers. We will be learning about groups that lived in many regions and how they survived and thrived. Also, we will learn about the similarities that we come across in our state that reflect Native cultures, practices, and ideas.

Note: You are welcome to join this class if you were not a part of the class last term.

Some class activities to expect:

Note Taking

Vocabulary 

Short Answer quizzes

Short Writing Assignments